Kuldhara in Jaiselmer – A Travel Shot

Today, a deserted land haunted by stories of akal, conflicts and migrations, Jaiselmer, India’s golden city and a major tourism hub was not always like what you hear. The region was located in the middle of flourishing trade routes connecting India with Persia and Arabian Desert cities via land route as well as ports of Gujarat. Opulence wealth had made it a pearl in Thar Desert. The region was largely inhabited by merchants and traders, especially by Palliwal Brahmins in mansions and houses that stand deserted today, appearing almost like freshly excavated cities of Indus Valley Civilization.

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We wanted a place of solace from city’s hustle and bustle and what could have been a better place than Kuldhara, the erstwhile thoroughfare of Palliwal Brahmins, but now a haunted place. 20 km further drive takes you to yet another abandoned village and a fort called Khabba Fort, a sight appears as if straight from Arabian Night sets. Spend two days and hop around desert villages. You will discover many more such abandoned houses.

Travel Tips:

Kuldhara is only 20 km from Jaiselmer. Most tourists don’t prefer to stay here, however we recommend to make Kuldhara your base at least for 2 days and 2 nights if you are a soul seeking traveller. You are at absolute peace in the rugged landscape with zero human interference, especially in starts studded nights. For a comfortable, yet budget accommodation check out Dreamline Cottages behind the heritage site. The rooms are clean, spacious with hot water facilities. Its owner is Mr Khan (+91 9929834687) who is a localite and knowledgeable. He also takes tourists on desert safari deep in Thar desert. Food is at extra cost and has to be told in advance. IMG_6757

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A Village near Kuldhara

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Kabba Fort and the Village

Palliwal Brahmins had established these villages in 13th century immediately after the Rajput Chieftain Jaisel Bhatti taking possession of Jaiselmer as the founder ruler. Trade was at its peak and the place had an advantage being far off from Agra-Delhi, the center of political power in India. Gifted by its extreme landscape the locals had mastered the guerrilla warfare. The loot wealth gave rise to prosperity over time attracting merchants in large numbers to settle in the region.  Though nothing has remained as markers of their prosperity in the villages around Kuldhara, but you see slices of their opulence at havelies of Jaiselmer.

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Havelies and Jain Temples at Jaiselmer

A popular story goes:

Some 200 years back the inhabitants of Jaiselmer were profusely rich and it was a seat of highly sophisticated culture.  In the desert trade caravan route there were 84 villages of Palliwal Brahmins that came under Jaiselmer kingdom.

Everything was going peaceful. But the trouble started With Salim Singh becoming the new Diwan who introduced fresh taxes and started oppression against villagers. He crossed his limits when his lusty eyes were set on a beautiful 15 year old girl in Kuldhara. He commanded the villagers to hand over her in 10 days time. 

On the next day, 83 people from Kuldhara were sent in all directions to rest 83 Palliwal villages for hosting community meetings.  On 5th or 6th day village representatives from all 84 villages assembled in Kuldhara and in a meeting it was decided that they had reached the limit of oppression. They also felt that the king of Jaiselmer had ditched them.  The only option was to pack-up and move somewhere else.  On 9th day all 84 villages were deserted.  They fled in the dark night, leaving behind their homes and everything within them. Kuldhara was abandoned by its very own people. No one saw the thousand-odd members of the village leave. For generations now, no one knows where the Paliwals have resettled. All that is known is they cursed the town when they left that no one would ever be able to settle down in Kuldhara again.

Today the houses are almost in the same condition as they were left behind by their inhabitants. In the middle of the abandoned village is an abandoned Jain Temple. From the terrace of the temple you can see the sprawling ruins of lanes and brick homes, equidistant from each other, are neatly laid out. There is also an abandoned boali, a traditional water harvesting structure built during the glorious days of Kuldhara.

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Kuldhara today is maintained by the Archaeological Survey of India as a heritage site.

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Author: Jitu Mishra

He can be contacted at jitumisra@gmail.com

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